Coronavirus gardening – What can you do in the garden during a lockdown?

The Coronavirus Covid-19 crisis shouldn’t keep you away from your garden. Quite the opposite, a lockdown is a great opportunity

to take even better care of your plants. Whether voluntary or imposed by the government, gardening is safe and will bear much more fruit than staying inside. Turn couch potatoes into real potatoes!

However, expect a few changes to your gardening routine:

What can I do in the garden during the Coronavirus lockdown?

First, a note of caution: don’t visit community gardens during lockdown. Better let dandelions spread there instead of Covid-19 germs! The situation is different for professional gardeners and landscapers during coronavirus lockdown, too.

So you’re in your own garden, ready to get dirty. Soil is still wet because of spring rains. Weeds are, as always, the first to make the most of it!

Weeds and weeding

Today is the perfect day to pull them out.

  • Soft, moist soil makes pulling them out very easy.
  • Being confined to your home and house unlocks hours of extra free time. It’s the perfect opportunity to weed undesirable plants out with your bare hands. Manual weeding is the ultimate choice for your garden, since it avoids all sorts of chemicals and herbicides.

Note – for best results, pull out the entire root system.

Renovating lawns

Spring is the best season to renew and re-seed your lawn.

Once you’ve pulled weeds out, here are our tips to rejuvenate an old lawn.

  • Now is also a good time to topdress your lawn to replenish its nutrients before spring kicks in.

You can still mow your lawn during lockdown.

  • But you must keep trimmings in your garden: no leaving the house to dump them at the local landfill or eco-center.

Trimming and pruning

There’s still time to catch up on pruning your roses, if you haven’t had the occasion yet.

Shrubs that have finished their winter blooming can also be pruned now.

And, of course, there are many types of hedges that can still be pruned nowadays.

Month-by-month garden checklist

Here, you can also go through these monthly garden task lists. There’s for sure a few things you can do in the garden to get a head start on March, April and May garden work.

Houseplants, also the perfect time for basic care

Your houseplants can benefit from proper repotting. It’s also time to prune some of the winter growth off, for instance on your Ficus ginseng.

If you see your leaf plants sagging and getting brown leaf tips, they’re lacking humidity in the air.

Children and lockdown gardening

Excellent opportunity to involve your children in the garden. More than just a way to spend time having fun, it’s also a very healthy way to build up immunity and teach kids how wonderful nature is.

If you’re looking for fun gardening to keep kids busy during the virus quarantine, these few activities will surely help:

Municipal eco-centers and waste disposal

In many countries, all eco-centers have closed their doors to the public due to sanitary precautions. This can last for a fortnight or more.

Getting rid of your weeds, lawn trimmings or hedge pruning waste that way is impossible.

The alternative? Set up a simple compost pile to stash all that nutrient-rich material!

Garden stores sell pet food during the coronavirus lockdown

A restricted number of garden stores are still open to the public, but only for animal and pet food. It’s the only thing they can sell!

  • Indeed, even though a sanitary crisis is at hand, our pets and animal friends still deserve to eat!
  • Some brands have decided to shut their doors entirely. It’s a wise decision to protect staff and customers from risk of Covid-19 contamination.
  • Landscapers and gardeners can work at their clients during lockdown, at least until “shelter-in-place” lockdown is mandated.

Usually, they may not sell anything else. So no buying of seeds, soil mix, fertilizer or other garden implements.

Worry not!

How to buy seeds and plants during coronavirus

Garden stores, nurseries, and horticulture centers have strict rules. They cannot sell plants such as trees, shrubs, bulbs or roses – in the store.

However, many now have online stores. It’s still perfectly possible to  buy online and have them delivered. You can, as of now, purchase plants, seedlings and seeds on the Internet.

Community gardens, plant fairs and flower shows

Cancellation of all plant fairs and flower events

Although spring is usually high season for plant fairs, farmer’s markets and flower shows, many events are officially canceled. This is important to protect people of all ages and their relatives that would otherwise have attended these events.

  • Botanical gardens have closed in order to minimize staff and visitor exposure.
  • Check their websites, though, because many have virtual tours. These will virtually immerse you in their beautiful nature!
  • For example, even the famed Chelsea flower show has been canceled.

Community gardens – avoid them until lockdown is over

  • Don’t work in shared gardens during the lockdown. They’re not places where you should go, since visitors from different places come and go.
  • Many municipalities have expressly voted to close any gardens they manage.
  • Keep in virtual touch though. Sow seeds of relationship instead of spreading virus germs to members of your local gardening community!

Smart tip about this Coronavirus crisis

Even when working outdoors, try to minimize contact with neighbors and passers-by on the street.

Gardening during coronavirus on social media

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