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Moon Planting calendar of October

2024 Moon phase calendar for gardening by the moon in the vegetable patch and flower beds.

Follow the moon's phases when planting and caring for plants in 2024: you'll grow beautiful seedlings, flowers, and harvest abundant crops.

Lunar phase calendar

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01 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

ORCHARD: Harvest apple, pear, plum, strawberry, raspberry, walnut; make preserves if needed / If you want to prepare your own rootstock for grafting fruit trees, cold-stratify peach, apricot and plum stones: toss them in a pot filled with sand buried all winter long near a north-facing wall.

VEGETABLE PATCH: Harvest cucumber, pickle, zucchini and strawberry, as well as any squash and pumpkin that might already be ripe (dry stem and yellow leaves) / In mild regions, sow faba bean / In warmer climates, sow jujuba.

02 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

ORCHARD: 2nd day for harvesting apple, pear, plum, strawberry, raspberry, walnut; make preserves if needed / If you want to prepare your own rootstock for grafting fruit trees, cold-stratify peach, apricot and plum stones: toss them in a pot filled with sand buried all winter long near a north-facing wall.

03 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow monthly cycle radish / Sow early carrot in the plot / Sow black salsify for a harvest in fall 2024, starting in October and continuing into winter / You can still try sowing a few early "pencil leek" (select cold-hardy winter varieties): you won't need to transplant them and they'll be ready for harvest next May / Cold-stratify root chervil seeds in a pot filled with sand and buried outdoors near a North-facing wall.

04 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for planting monthly cycle radish / Sow early carrot in the plot / Sow black salsify for a harvest in fall 2024, starting in October and continuing into winter / You can still try sowing a few early "pencil leek" (select cold-hardy winter varieties): you won't need to transplant them and they'll be ready for harvest next May / Cold-stratify root chervil seeds in a pot filled with sand and buried outdoors near a North-facing wall.

05 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for planting monthly cycle radish / Sow early carrot in the plot / Sow black salsify for a harvest in fall 2024, starting in October and continuing into winter / You can still try sowing a few early "pencil leek" (select cold-hardy winter varieties): you won't need to transplant them and they'll be ready for harvest next May / Cold-stratify root chervil seeds in a pot filled with sand and buried outdoors near a North-facing wall.

06 October
Flower day
Descending Moon
Last quarter
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: Plant biennials and perennials sown this summer; also plant daylily and peony / Plant spring bulbs and lily (except for Madonna lily) / Plant flower shrubs / As the first frosts draw near, pull out begonia, dahlia, canna and gladiolus and store them safely once bulbs and rhizomes have dried out a bit.

07 October
Flower day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Until 6 PM (18:00), flower day:

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for planting biennials and perennials sown this summer; also plant daylily and peony / Plant spring bulbs and lily (except for Madonna lily) / Plant flower shrubs / As the first frosts draw near, pull out begonia, dahlia, canna and gladiolus and store them safely once bulbs and rhizomes have dried out a bit.

After 6 PM (18:00), entering a leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: If not done yet, transplant white cabbage to the growing bed (use root dip if you can't keep the clump whole when pulling the seedlings out), spacing distance 16 inches (40 cm), ridge immediately / Sow green manure (rye and vetch) on vacant plots in the vegetable patch / Protect tarragon: cut leafage back and cover with fern fronds

Harvest mature kohlrabi (remaining ones can grow until early November): cut roots and leaves off and store in a cellar in a crate of sand.

08 October
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for transplanting white cabbage to the growing bed (use root dip if you can't keep the clump whole when pulling the seedlings out); space them by 16 inches (40 cm) and ridge them / Sow green manure (rye and vetch) on vacant plots in the vegetable patch / Protect tarragon: cut leafage back and cover with fern fronds

Harvest mature kohlrabi (remaining ones can grow until early November): cut roots and leaves off and store in a cellar in a crate of sand.

09 October
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Before 9:19 AM, leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for transplanting white cabbage to the growing bed (use root dip if you can't keep the clump whole when pulling the seedlings out); space them by 16 inches (40 cm) and ridge them / Sow green manure (rye and vetch) on vacant plots in the vegetable patch / Protect tarragon: cut leafage back and cover with fern fronds

Harvest mature kohlrabi (remaining ones can grow until early November): cut roots and leaves off and store in a cellar in a crate of sand.

After 9:19 AM, entering a fruit & seed day:

ORCHARD: Pick mummified fruits and dead leaves off trees and destroy them; treat fruit trees against brown rot with bordeaux mixture if the weather is mild (50°F or 9°C during the daytime) and dry / Harvest olive if freezing is forecast and bring them to the oil mill immediately, or steep them in brine after bruising or pricking holes in them / Keep planting all berry shrubs sold in containers.

VEGETABLE PATCH: Plant a few last strawberry bushes.

10 October
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden before 8:45 AM – moon is at apogee at 3:41 AM

ORCHARD: 2nd day for picking mummified fruits and dead leaves off trees and destroy them; treat fruit trees against brown rot with bordeaux mixture if the weather is mild (50°F or 9°C during the daytime) and dry / Harvest olive if freezing is forecast and bring them to the oil mill immediately, or steep them in brine after bruising or pricking holes in them / Keep planting all berry shrubs sold in containers.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for planting the last strawberry bushes.

11 October
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

ORCHARD: 3rd day for picking mummified fruits and dead leaves off trees and destroy them; treat fruit trees against brown rot with bordeaux mixture if the weather is mild (50°F or 9°C during the daytime) and dry / Harvest olive if freezing is forecast and bring them to the oil mill immediately, or steep them in brine after bruising or pricking holes in them / Keep planting all berry shrubs sold in containers.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for planting the last strawberry bushes.

12 October
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Before 10:20 AM, fruit & seed day:

ORCHARD: 4th day for picking mummified fruits and dead leaves off trees and destroy them; treat fruit trees against brown rot with bordeaux mixture if the weather is mild (50°F or 9°C during the daytime) and dry / Harvest olive if freezing is forecast and bring them to the oil mill immediately, or steep them in brine after bruising or pricking holes in them / Keep planting all berry shrubs sold in containers.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 4th day for planting the last strawberry bushes.

After 10:20 AM, entering a root day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Plant gray shallot atop ridges in well-draining soil / Plant onion seedlings started off in August-September / Harvest all root vegetables that can't overwinter in the ground (crosnes, red beet) and mulch the rest / Pull out endive (chicory) roots without damaging them, and let them dry out (cure) for a week or two on the ground; protect them from direct sun with a cover of dry leaves or fern fronds; after that, shake excess dirt off, remove smaller roots and cut all foliage just above the crown / Thin your most recent root vegetable sprouts / Prepare plots where you'll soon be planting onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion...

ORCHARD, LANDSCAPING: Spread ripe compost around your trees.

13 October
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for planting gray shallot atop ridges in well-draining soil / Plant onion seedlings started off in August-September / Harvest all root vegetables that can't overwinter in the ground (crosnes, red beet) and mulch the rest / Pull out endive (chicory) roots without damaging them, and let them dry out (cure) for a week or two on the ground; protect them from direct sun with a cover of dry leaves or fern fronds; after that, shake excess dirt off, remove smaller roots and cut all foliage just above the crown / Thin your most recent root vegetable sprouts / Prepare plots where you'll soon be planting onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion...

ORCHARD, LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for spreading ripe compost around your trees.

14 October
Roots Day
Descending Moon
New moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden after 12:55 PM (12:55) – solar eclipse at 5:59 PM (17:59)

VEGETABLE PATCH: 4th day for planting gray shallot atop ridges in well-draining soil / Plant onion seedlings started off in August-September / Harvest all root vegetables that can't overwinter in the ground (crosnes, red beet) and mulch the rest / Pull out endive (chicory) roots without damaging them, and let them dry out (cure) for a week or two on the ground; protect them from direct sun with a cover of dry leaves or fern fronds; after that, shake excess dirt off, remove smaller roots and cut all foliage just above the crown / Thin your most recent root vegetable sprouts / Prepare plots where you'll soon be planting onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion...

ORCHARD, LANDSCAPING: 3rd day for spreading ripe compost around your trees.

15 October
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden before 6:15 AM – lunar node at 1:11 AM

VEGETABLE PATCH: 4th day for planting gray shallot atop ridges in well-draining soil / Plant onion seedlings started off in August-September / Harvest all root vegetables that can't overwinter in the ground (crosnes, red beet) and mulch the rest / Pull out endive (chicory) roots without damaging them, and let them dry out (cure) for a week or two on the ground; protect them from direct sun with a cover of dry leaves or fern fronds; after that, shake excess dirt off, remove smaller roots and cut all foliage just above the crown / Thin your most recent root vegetable sprouts / Prepare plots where you'll soon be planting onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion...

ORCHARD, LANDSCAPING: 4th day for spreading ripe compost around your trees.

16 October
Flower day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: If not done yet, now is the time to plant biennials and perennials sown from June to August / Keep planting lily of the valley, hemerocallis and peony, spring bulbs and lily (but not Madonna lily) / Plant primrose as a biennial: this hardy flower will have time to settle in and will bloom more abundantly in spring

Finish planting perennials and flower shrubs purchased in pots / You can still divide clumps of perennial flowers / After the first frosts, pull out canna, dahlia, gladiolus and begonia and store them safely once bulbs and rhizomes have dried out a bit / Remove wilted leaves from deciduous foliage perennials.

VEGETABLE PATCH: Plant spring harvest cauliflower / If not done yet, now is the time to protect artichoke (thin the leaves and tie remaining healthy leaves in an upright bundle, ridge 8 inches / 20 cm high, and mulch with straw in cold climates).

17 October
Flower day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day, if not done yet, to plant biennials and perennials sown from June to August / Keep planting lily of the valley, hemerocallis and peony, spring bulbs and lily (but not Madonna lily) / Plant primrose as a biennial: this hardy flower will have time to settle in and will bloom more abundantly in spring

Finish planting perennials and flower shrubs purchased in pots / You can still divide clumps of perennial flowers / After the first frosts, pull out canna, dahlia, gladiolus and begonia and store them safely once bulbs and rhizomes have dried out a bit / Remove wilted leaves from deciduous foliage perennials.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for planting spring harvest cauliflower / If not done yet, now is the time to protect artichoke (thin the leaves and tie remaining healthy leaves in an upright bundle, ridge 8 inches / 20 cm high, and mulch with straw in cold climates).

18 October
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Again, a few days are given for for transplanting white cabbage to the growing bed (use root dip if you can't keep the clump whole when pulling the seedlings out) / Sow green manure (rye and vetch) on vacant plots in the vegetable patch / Take care of the endives you dug out recently: select the largest ones, shorten them to 8 inches (20 cm), and only keep an inch of leafage (a few cm). / Stack them together vertically in moist soil in a tray or crate; store in a dark cellar or in the vegetable patch under a thick, opaque tarpaulin / Protect tarragon: cut leafage back and cover with fern fronds

Harvest mature kohlrabi (remaining ones can grow until early November): cut roots and leaves off and store in a cellar in a crate of sand

Blanch your cardoon: first remove any damaged leaves, then tie each clump into an upright bundle; wrap with a carton or several layers of old newspapers; you can start harvesting blanched stems in 2 to 3 weeks.

19 October
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for transplanting white cabbage to the growing bed (use root dip if you can't keep the clump whole when pulling the seedlings out) / Sow green manure (rye and vetch) on vacant plots in the vegetable patch / Take care of the endives you dug out recently: select the largest ones, shorten them to 8 inches (20 cm), and only keep an inch of leafage (a few cm). / Stack them together vertically in moist soil in a tray or crate; store in a dark cellar or in the vegetable patch under a thick, opaque tarpaulin / Protect tarragon: cut leafage back and cover with fern fronds

Harvest mature kohlrabi (remaining ones can grow until early November): cut roots and leaves off and store in a cellar in a crate of sand

Blanch your cardoon: first remove any damaged leaves, then tie each clump into an upright bundle; wrap with a carton or several layers of old newspapers; you can start harvesting blanched stems in 2 to 3 weeks.

20 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Before 9:14 AM, as the moon is descending:

ORCHARD: Pick mummified fruits and dead leaves off trees; destroy them; treat fruit trees against brown rot with bordeaux mixture if the weather is mild (50°F or 9°C during the daytime) and dry / Harvest olive if freezing is forecast and bring them to the oil mill immediately, or steep them in brine after bruising or pricking holes in them / Gather raspberry offshoots to transplant them elsewhere. / Keep planting berry shrubs sold in containers / Though you won't plant them until end of fall, dig the planting holes for future fruit trees

VEGETABLE PATCH: Plant a few last strawberry bushes.

After 9:14 AM, the moon begins to ascend again:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow faba bean, snow pea and round pea, in mild climates. / In warmer climates, sow jujuba / Harvest any ripe fruits.

ORCHARD: If you want to prepare your own grafting rootstock for new stone fruit trees, cold-stratify stones and pits: place peach, plum and apricot stones in a pot filled with sand buried all winter long near a north-facing wall.

21 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day to sow faba bean, snow pea and round pea, in mild climates. / In warmer climates, sow jujuba / Harvest any ripe fruits.

ORCHARD: 2nd day, if you want to prepare your own grafting rootstock for new stone fruit trees, for cold-stratifying stones and pits: place peach, plum and apricot stones in a pot filled with sand buried all winter long near a north-facing wall.

22 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
First quarter
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow monthly cycle radish and half-long carrot under a cold frame or tunnel for an early spring harvest / If not done yet, cold-stratify root chervil seeds in a pot filled with sand placed outdoors in a spot exposed to the North / Check on your potato tubers and twist off sprouting shoots, if any.

23 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing monthly cycle radish and half-long carrot under a cold frame or tunnel for an early spring harvest / If not done yet, cold-stratify root chervil seeds in a pot filled with sand placed outdoors in a spot exposed to the North / Check on your potato tubers and twist off sprouting shoots, if any.

24 October
Flower day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Finish the harvest of saffron / Harvest your cauliflower and sow a new batch in the ground under a cold frame, they'll be ready for transplanting in a month.

INDOORS: Start forcing hyacinth bulbs in special water-filled forcing vases for them to bloom this winter: set them in a cool, dark place until a crown of leaves appears, at which point you can transfer them to a warmer, well-lit room.

LANDSCAPING: Sow perennial sweet pea directly in the ground under a lattice that will help it climb (it'll sprout early spring) / In regions with milder climates, you can still sow hardy flowers (columbine, godetia, Jupiter's helm, hollyhock, Delphinium, bellflower, wallflower, knapweed...) so they're ready to transplant in spring.

25 October
Flower day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for finishing the harvest of saffron / Harvest your cauliflower and sow a new batch in the ground under a cold frame, they'll be ready for transplanting in a month.

INDOORS: 2nd day to start forcing hyacinth bulbs in special water-filled forcing vases for them to bloom this winter: set them in a cool, dark place until a crown of leaves appears, at which point you can transfer them to a warmer, well-lit room.

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for sowing perennial sweet pea directly in the ground under a lattice that will help it climb (it'll sprout early spring) / In regions with milder climates, you can still sow hardy flowers (columbine, godetia, Jupiter's helm, hollyhock, Delphinium, bellflower, wallflower, knapweed...) so they're ready to transplant in spring.

26 October
Leaf Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden before 8:05 AM – moon is at perigee at 9:01 AM

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow spinach, small-leaved corn salad and winter lettuce (under a cold frame for the lettuce), chervil, arugula, garden cress, watercress, parsley, Bremen cabbage (a type of non-headed kale from which you harvest leaves every now and then once winter has started), early harvest lettuce (again, under shelter) / Also sow green manure to keep any free vegetable patch plots covered until spring (mustard, vetch, rye...) / Harvest spinach, headed lettuce, garden cress, corn salad, sorrel, Mizuna cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and blanched vegetables (chicory, frisée endive, branch celery, cardoon) / Harvest herbs and dry or freeze them.

27 October
Leaf Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing spinach, small-leaved corn salad and winter lettuce (under a cold frame for the lettuce), chervil, arugula, garden cress, watercress, parsley, Bremen cabbage (a type of non-headed kale from which you harvest leaves every now and then once winter has started), early harvest lettuce (again, under shelter) / Also sow green manure to keep any free vegetable patch plots covered until spring (mustard, vetch, rye...) / Harvest spinach, headed lettuce, garden cress, corn salad, sorrel, Mizuna cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and blanched vegetables (chicory, frisée endive, branch celery, cardoon) / Harvest herbs and dry or freeze them.

28 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Full moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden today, or at least not before 8:15 AM (lunar node at 3:13 AM) nor after 3:10 PM (15:10) (lunar eclipse at 8:14 PM (20:14)

Before 10:21 AM, leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for sowing spinach, small-leaved corn salad and winter lettuce (under a cold frame for the lettuce), chervil, arugula, garden cress, watercress, parsley, Bremen cabbage (a type of non-headed kale from which you harvest leaves every now and then once winter has started), early harvest lettuce (again, under shelter) / Also sow green manure to keep any free vegetable patch plots covered until spring (mustard, vetch, rye...) / Harvest spinach, headed lettuce, garden cress, corn salad, sorrel, Mizuna cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and blanched vegetables (chicory, frisée endive, branch celery, cardoon) / Harvest herbs and dry or freeze them.

After 10:21 AM, entering a fruit & seed day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Finish harvesting fruit vegetables (last tomato, squash, pumpkin, bell pepper, chili, bean).

ORCHARD: Finish harvesting all fruits / If the first frosts have hit, harvest fruits that require bletting: persimmon, medlar / Keep harvesting olive / In mild climates, sow faba bean and round pea.

29 October
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for finishing the harvest of fruit vegetables (last tomato, squash, pumpkin, bell pepper, chili, bean).

ORCHARD: 2nd day to finish harvesting all fruits / If the first frosts have hit, harvest fruits that require bletting: persimmon, medlar / Keep harvesting olive / In mild climates, sow faba bean and round pea.

30 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Prepare plots where you'll plant onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion... / If not done yet, you can still pull endives out and let them dry for around ten days, mulching them lightly to protect them from frost / Pull out and store remaining red beet, and mulch root vegetables that can stay in the ground during winter / Remove sprouts from potatoes and check that vegetables stored in silos aren't going bad / In a cold frame, sow a last batch of baby carrots and red radish / Sow rows of chervil.

31 October
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for preparing plots where you'll plant onion, garlic, chives, Welsh onion... / If not done yet, you can still pull endives out and let them dry for around ten days, mulching them lightly to protect them from frost / Pull out and store remaining red beet, and mulch root vegetables that can stay in the ground during winter / Remove sprouts from potatoes and check that vegetables stored in silos aren't going bad / In a cold frame, sow a last batch of baby carrots and red radish / Sow rows of chervil.

Legend
Day Moon Moon disc

* Times on this calendar are for the North Hemisphere. They're given in Universal Time (GMT), meaning they're computed based on the Greenwich meridian.

Depending on where you live, you can adjust the time down to the exact minute to have your true "local moon planting time". If you're East of the Greenwich meridian, you must add minutes; if West, subtract them. A good rule of thumb is to consider your time zone: if your local time is GMT+1, as in Paris, then you must add an hour; if it's GMT-5, as in New York, you must subtract 5 hours. A node at 3PM GMT in London will take place at 4PM (16:00) in Paris and 10AM in New York. You can even adjust for minutes in the same manner, if you're far east or west within your time zone.

In addition, in some parts of the world, you might have to adjust these times because of "Daylight Saving Time". In this case, you should adjust by an hour compared to Standard Time, in addition to the modification resulting from your timezone.

** Gardening isn't recommended 5-6 hours before and after a lunar node, apogee or perigee.

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Your reactions
  • cate maccoll wrote on 19 June 2024 at 22 h 38 min
    im super confused, this calender says the full moon was on the 4th and the new moon is on the 18th, but thats not correct. this can’t be the calender for 2024, it does say it is though. help anyone?

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

  • Lu Narine wrote on 27 May 2024 at 21 h 01 min

    I’m mystified why 5 days of the end of May are missing from the website.ie May 27-31.
    Hard to know what tasks are best done during this period. Do you have the data to email me?

    Was this an oversight or intentional? I find your site is SUCH an asset to my gardening and I appreciate it!!!!!

  • Susan Vaughn wrote on 22 May 2024 at 4 h 19 min

    Can I transplant a “Japanese Maple” after May 21-May 31st. 2024? The plant is 2′ high

  • Kay Dunbar wrote on 8 April 2024 at 5 h 31 min

    I love the calendars that my pharmacy puts out every year which show the best sign of the moon when to plant flowers and garden with seeds or plants and has a sheet at back or calendar with information. It has all the information about that you need for flowers and garden but I never got one this year . He was out when I went so I got on the computer to see what I could find. I just came upon this but haven’t got to read all of it but what I have seen, looks like you have covered everything for flowers and garden.

  • Barb wrote on 6 January 2024 at 17 h 32 min

    On the Planting by the Moon calendar for Jan 6 2024 there is a statement which indicates it is time to “set up rose hips” for grafting. How exactly do you set up rose hips?