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Moon Planting calendar of May

2024 Moon phase calendar for gardening by the moon in the vegetable patch and flower beds.

Follow the moon's phases when planting and caring for plants in 2024: you'll grow beautiful seedlings, flowers, and harvest abundant crops.

Lunar phase calendar

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01 May
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Before 3:55 PM (15:55), fruit & seed day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 4th opportunity for transplanting in rich compost-amended soil eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels / In milder regions, Peruvian groundcherry is a perennial; instead of sowing, divide last year's clumps.

BERRY FRUITS: 4th day for planting sea-buckthorn / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

After 3:55 PM (15:55), entering a root day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: In places with mild weather, plant sweet potato directly in the plot (ridge after it sprouts); elsewhere, start germinating your tubers in crates in a warm spot / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past) and ridge potatoes planted last month if they're tall enough / Plant Jerusalem artichoke
Finish planting pink shallot and pink garlic / Thin your root vegetable sprouts (carrot, radish...) / Transplant celeriac / Transfer leek sown last winter to the growing bed / Plant mashua in mild climates (wait for mid-May in other areas) / Plant crosnes in light soil.

02 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day, in places with mild weather, for planting sweet potato directly in the plot (ridge after it sprouts); elsewhere, start germinating your tubers in crates in a warm spot / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past) and ridge potatoes planted last month if they're tall enough / Plant Jerusalem artichoke / Finish planting pink shallot and pink garlic / Thin your root vegetable sprouts (carrot, radish...) / Transplant celeriac / Transfer leek sown last winter to the growing bed / Plant mashua in mild climates (wait for mid-May in other areas) / Plant crosnes in light soil.

03 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day, in places with mild weather, for planting sweet potato directly in the plot (ridge after it sprouts); elsewhere, start germinating your tubers in crates in a warm spot / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past) and ridge potatoes planted last month if they're tall enough / Plant Jerusalem artichoke / Finish planting pink shallot and pink garlic / Thin your root vegetable sprouts (carrot, radish...) / Transplant celeriac / Transfer leek sown last winter to the growing bed / Plant mashua in mild climates (wait for mid-May in other areas) / Plant crosnes in light soil.

04 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden after 4:55 PM (16:55) – lunar node at 9:21 PM (21:56)

VEGETABLE PATCH: 4th day, in places with mild weather, for planting sweet potato directly in the plot (ridge after it sprouts); elsewhere, start germinating your tubers in crates in a warm spot / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past) and ridge potatoes planted last month if they're tall enough / Plant Jerusalem artichoke / Finish planting pink shallot and pink garlic / Thin your root vegetable sprouts (carrot, radish...) / Transplant celeriac / Transfer leek sown last winter to the growing bed / Plant mashua in mild climates (wait for mid-May in other areas) / Plant crosnes in light soil.

05 May
Flower day
Descending Moon
Full moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden after 12:20 PM (12:20) – moon eclipse at 5:24 PM (17:24)

LANDSCAPING: Plant all summer bulbs / Keep clearing perennial flower beds and dividing clumps that are too large / Plant perennials purchased in nursery pots, gladiolus, dahlia and canna, and, in milder regions, annuals sown in January (pelargonium, carnation and begonia) / Transplant to the flower bed your impatiens seedlings, and to pots those of petunia that were set to sprout last February, and thin sprouts for annuals sown end of March or early April / Keep pruning shrubs that have lost their flowers by now.

VEGETABLE PATCH: Transplant broccoli and cauliflower cabbage sown in February or early March.

06 May
Flower day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for planting all summer bulbs / Keep clearing perennial flower beds and dividing clumps that are too large / Plant perennials purchased in nursery pots, gladiolus, dahlia and canna, and, in milder regions, annuals sown in January (pelargonium, carnation and begonia) / Transplant to the flower bed your impatiens seedlings, and to pots those of petunia that were set to sprout last February, and thin sprouts for annuals sown end of March or early April / Keep pruning shrubs that have lost their flowers by now.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for transplanting broccoli and cauliflower cabbage sown in February or early March.

07 May
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Another chance, before the moon starts ascending next Tuesday, to plant headed, red, green and Milan cabbage, as well as kale, white cabbage and Brussels sprouts sown last March-April / Transplant branch celery sown in April, and also white cabbage and Brussels sprouts sown more recently / Plant perennial and annual herbs / If not done yet, now is a good time to transplant seedlings under a tunnel for chicory (sown in March-April), but only if leaves have 5 true leaves (keep a lookout for slugs) / Prune medicinal sage (cut it back by half) and pinch tips of rosemary, savory, oregano, thyme.

LANDSCAPING: If not done yet, mow and dethatch your lawn / Prune evergreen hedges and topiary shrubs.

08 May
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Before 6:01 PM (18:01), leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day, before the moon starts ascending next Tuesday, for planting headed, red, green or Milan cabbage, as well as kale, white cabbage and Brussels sprouts sown last March-April / Transplant branch celery sown in April, and also white cabbage and Brussels sprouts sown more recently / Plant perennial and annual herbs / If not done yet, now is a good time to transplant seedlings under a tunnel for chicory (sown in March-April), but only if leaves have 5 true leaves (keep a lookout for slugs) / Prune medicinal sage (cut it back by half) and pinch tips of rosemary, savory, oregano, thyme.

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day, if not done yet, for mowing and dethatching the lawn / Prune evergreen hedges and topiary shrubs.

After 6:01 PM (18:01), entering a fruit & seed day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Short opportunity, before the moon begins to ascend again tomorrow morning, for transplanting (in soil enriched with compost) eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels (Ice Saints coming soon) / In milder regions, Peruvian groundcherry is a perennial; instead of sowing, divide last year's clumps.

BERRY FRUITS: Plant sea-buckthorn / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

09 May
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Before 8:57 AM, as the moon is descending:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Second short opportunity, before the moon begins to ascend again, to transplant in rich compost-amended soil eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels (watch out for the Ice Saints) / In milder regions, Peruvian groundcherry is a perennial; instead of sowing, divide last year's clumps.

BERRY FRUITS: 2nd short time slot for planting sea-buckthorn / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

After 8:57 AM, the moon begins to ascend again:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow all sorts of bean (pole bean, dwarf bean, butterbean, string bean, shell bean...) / Sow chick pea / Sow melon and cucumber / Sow sweet corn: in groups of 3 or 4 plants, or as side-by-side rows (to improve pollination that only happens through wind) / Sow lentil in light soil: along a row, cover with soil but don't water; when it sprouts, thin to keep only one plant every 16 inches (40 cm); ridge when plants are 6 inches tall (15 cm); only water during heat waves and during blooming; harvest in 4-5 months.

10 May
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing bean (pole bean, dwarf bean, butterbean, string bean, shell bean...) / Sow chick pea / Sow melon and cucumber / Sow sweet corn: in groups of 3 or 4 plants, or as side-by-side rows (to improve pollination that only happens through wind) / Sow lentil in light soil: along a row, cover with soil but don't water; when it sprouts, thin to keep only one plant every 16 inches (40 cm); ridge when plants are 6 inches tall (15 cm); only water during heat waves and during blooming; harvest in 4-5 months.

11 May
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden before 10:05 AM – moon is at perigee at 5:05 AM

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow carrot for a winter harvest; alternate rows with radish: thanks to the carrots, your radish won't be as spicy / If not done yet, sow chicory in soil that hasn't been amended with manure for the past 2 years (at least) / You can still sow red beet, swede, kohlrabi, parsnip, turnip, root parsley, helianthis, salsify (common and black), and winter leek (you'll transplant these to the growing bed when they're as fat as a pencil).

12 May
Roots Day
Rising moon
Last quarter
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing carrot for a winter harvest; alternate rows with radish: thanks to the carrots, your radish won't be as spicy / If not done yet, sow chicory in soil that hasn't been amended with manure for the past 2 years (at least) / You can still sow red beet, swede, kohlrabi, parsnip, turnip, root parsley, helianthis, salsify (common and black), and winter leek (you'll transplant these to the growing bed when they're as fat as a pencil).

13 May
Flower day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: It's still time to sow flower annuals right in the flower bed: California poppy, everlasting, cosmos, cornflower, nasturtium, clarkia, sweet alyssum, morning glory, mallow, sunflower; and also biennials such as wallflower; cover seeds and water.

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow cauliflower and broccoli straight in the growing bed, in rich soil amended with compost (one seed every 1-2 inches (3-4 cm), rows 2 feet apart (60 cm).

14 May
Flower day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for sowing flower annuals right in the flower bed: California poppy, everlasting, cosmos, cornflower, nasturtium, clarkia, sweet alyssum, morning glory, mallow, sunflower; and also biennials such as wallflower; cover seeds and water.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing cauliflower and broccoli straight in the growing bed, in rich soil amended with compost (one seed every 1-2 inches (3-4 cm), rows 2 feet apart (60 cm).

15 May
Leaf Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow mesclun (harvest in 4 to 6 weeks) and lettuce: batavia, head lettuce, romaine, cutting lettuce / Sow orache directly in the plot, only burying seeds just a little; select gold or red varieties that will add color to the vegetable patch / Sow cardoon in place, water beforehand if the soil is very dry / Sow chard, also in the growing bed
Sow kale and Brussels sprouts in a nursery / Sow spinach / Sow oyster plant (Mertensia maritima) / In a well-exposed nursery or under a tunnel, if the soil is warm enough (at least 54°F or 12°C), sow branch celery and sweet fennel.

LANDSCAPING: Sow lawn seed in well-prepared soil, rake it in evenly (criss-cross pattern), roll it down and water until it sprouts.

16 May
Leaf Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing mesclun (harvest in 4 to 6 weeks) and lettuce: batavia, head lettuce, romaine, cutting lettuce / Sow orache directly in the plot, only burying seeds just a little; select gold or red varieties that will add color to the vegetable patch / Sow cardoon in place, water beforehand if the soil is very dry / Sow chard, also in the growing bed / Sow kale and Brussels sprouts in a nursery / Sow spinach / Sow oyster plant (Mertensia maritima) / In a well-exposed nursery or under a tunnel, if the soil is warm enough (at least 54°F or 12°C), sow branch celery and sweet fennel.

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for sowing lawn seed in well-prepared soil, rake it in evenly (criss-cross pattern), roll it down and water until it sprouts.

17 May
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden after 2:35 PM (14:35) – lunar node at 7:35 PM (19:35)

Before 10:32 AM, leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for sowing mesclun (harvest in 4 to 6 weeks) and lettuce: batavia, head lettuce, romaine, cutting lettuce / Sow orache directly in the plot, only burying seeds just a little; select gold or red varieties that will add color to the vegetable patch / Sow cardoon in place, water beforehand if the soil is very dry / Sow chard, also in the growing bed / Sow kale and Brussels sprouts in a nursery / Sow spinach / Sow oyster plant (Mertensia maritima) / In a well-exposed nursery or under a tunnel, if the soil is warm enough (at least 54°F or 12°C), sow branch celery and sweet fennel.

LANDSCAPING: 3rd day for sowing lawn seed in well-prepared soil, rake it in evenly (criss-cross pattern), roll it down and water until it sprouts.

After 10:32 AM, entering a fruit & seed day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: New time slot to sow bean, shell pea, chick pea and faba bean directly in the growing bed / Sow, also in a growing bed with rich soil, squash, zucchini, pickle, cucumber and colocynth / Sow sweet corn: in groups of 3 or 4 plants, or as side-by-side rows (to improve pollination that only happens through wind) / Sow lentil in light soil.

18 May
Fruit Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing bean, shell pea, chick pea and faba bean directly in the growing bed / Sow, also in a growing bed with rich soil, squash, zucchini, pickle, cucumber and colocynth / Sow sweet corn: in groups of 3 or 4 plants, or as side-by-side rows (to improve pollination that only happens through wind) / Sow lentil in light soil.

19 May
Roots Day
Rising moon
New moon
Ephemeris:

Before 10:26 AM, fruit & seed day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for sowing bean, shell pea, chick and regular pea and faba bean directly in the growing bed / Sow, also in a growing bed with rich soil, squash, zucchini, pickle, cucumber and colocynth / Sow sweet corn: in groups of 3 or 4 plants, or as side-by-side rows (to improve pollination that only happens through wind) / Sow lentil in light soil.

After 10:26 AM, entering a root day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Sow carrot for a winter harvest; alternate rows with radish: thanks to the carrots, your radish won't be as spicy / If not done yet, sow chicory in soil that hasn't been amended with manure for the past 2 years (at least) / You can still sow red beet, swede, kohlrabi, parsnip, turnip, root parsley, helianthis, salsify (common and black), and winter leek (you'll transplant these to the growing bed when they're as fat as a pencil).

20 May
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for sowing carrot for a winter harvest; alternate rows with radish: thanks to the carrots, your radish won't be as spicy / If not done yet, sow chicory in soil that hasn't been amended with manure for the past 2 years (at least) / You can still sow red beet, swede, kohlrabi, parsnip, turnip, root parsley, helianthis, salsify (common and black), and winter leek (you'll transplant these to the growing bed when they're as fat as a pencil).

21 May
Roots Day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for sowing carrot for a winter harvest; alternate rows with radish: thanks to the carrots, your radish won't be as spicy / If not done yet, sow chicory in soil that hasn't been amended with manure for the past 2 years (at least) / You can still sow red beet, swede, kohlrabi, parsnip, turnip, root parsley, helianthis, salsify (common and black), and winter leek (you'll transplant these to the growing bed when they're as fat as a pencil).

22 May
Flower day
Rising moon
Ephemeris:

Before 2:06 PM (14:06), as the moon is still ascending:

LANDSCAPING: Last chance to sow, directly in the flower bed, fast-growing annuals (hollyhock, oriental poppy, cup-and-saucer vine, black-eyed Susan, nasturtium, honesty...) and, in a nursery, biennials (forget-me-not, sweet william, primrose, ravenelle wallflower...).

VEGETABLE PATCH: Finish sowing broccoli and cauliflower, in a nursery.

After 2:06 PM (14:06), the moon begins to descend:

LANDSCAPING: Assemble potted compositions and settle flower beds by planting impatiens, petunia, begonia, pelargonium, clove pink and all the annuals / Transplant pot-bought lily-of-the-valley: settle it in part shade, in light and cool soil / Keep pruning and shaping spring-blooming shrubs that have by now lost their flowers / Prepare cuttings from flower shrubs (cinquefoil, deutzia, mock-orange, weigela, snowball, forsythia...) and from clematis and fuchsia; prick the cuttings in pots filled with a light substrate and keep under a cold frame / Prepare cuttings from tall herbaceous perennials and flower-bearing succulents / Pull out tulip, narcissus and hyacinth (keep leaves attached to the bulb); place the bulbs in a crate; you can then store them or transplant them elsewhere (divide clumps of bulblets and toss out any damaged bulbs) / Plant canna lily, dahlia, Ethiopian arum, gladiolus, tuber begonia and annual flowers that were sown at the end of winter / Also settle in place all pelargonium, carnation and annual begonia sown end of January / Thin flower sprouts for those sown directly in flower beds in April.

VEGETABLE PATCH: In colder areas, you can transplant artichoke seedlings
Thin broccoli and cauliflower sprouts sown early May, and transplant those sown a few weeks ago to the growing bed if not done yet.

23 May
Flower day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day for bringing potted compositions and flower beds together by planting impatiens, petunia, begonia, pelargonium, clove pink and all the annuals / Transplant pot-bought lily-of-the-valley: settle it in part shade, in light and cool soil / Keep pruning and shaping spring-blooming shrubs that have by now lost their flowers / Prepare cuttings from flower shrubs (cinquefoil, deutzia, mock-orange, weigela, snowball, forsythia...) and from clematis and fuchsia; prick the cuttings in pots filled with a light substrate and keep under a cold frame / Prepare cuttings from tall herbaceous perennials and flower-bearing succulents / Pull out tulip, narcissus and hyacinth (keep leaves attached to the bulb); place the bulbs in a crate; you can then store them or transplant them elsewhere (divide clumps of bulblets and toss out any damaged bulbs) / Plant canna lily, dahlia, Ethiopian arum, gladiolus, tuber begonia and annual flowers that were sown at the end of winter / Also settle in place all pelargonium, carnation and annual begonia sown end of January / Thin flower sprouts for those sown directly in flower beds in April.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day, in colder areas, for transplanting artichoke seedlings / Thin broccoli and cauliflower sprouts sown early May, and transplant those sown a few weeks ago to the growing bed if not done yet.

24 May
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Before 9:12 AM, flower day:

LANDSCAPING: 3rd day for bringing potted compositions and flower beds together by planting impatiens, petunia, begonia, pelargonium, clove pink and all the annuals / Transplant pot-bought lily-of-the-valley: settle it in part shade, in light and cool soil / Keep pruning and shaping spring-blooming shrubs that have by now lost their flowers / Prepare cuttings from flower shrubs (cinquefoil, deutzia, mock-orange, weigela, snowball, forsythia...) and from clematis and fuchsia; prick the cuttings in pots filled with a light substrate and keep under a cold frame / Prepare cuttings from tall herbaceous perennials and flower-bearing succulents / Pull out tulip, narcissus and hyacinth (keep leaves attached to the bulb); place the bulbs in a crate; you can then store them or transplant them elsewhere (divide clumps of bulblets and toss out any damaged bulbs) / Plant canna lily, dahlia, Ethiopian arum, gladiolus, tuber begonia and annual flowers that were sown at the end of winter / Also settle in place all pelargonium, carnation and annual begonia sown end of January / Thin flower sprouts for those sown directly in flower beds in April.

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day, in colder areas, for transplanting artichoke seedlings / Thin broccoli and cauliflower sprouts sown early May, and transplant those sown a few weeks ago to the growing bed if not done yet.

After 9:12 AM, entering a leaf day:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Settle herbs in the garden (in the vegetable patch, pair them with vegetables because they repel certain parasites) / Harvest horsetail and dry it in the shade / If you haven't had time to do so end of april, it's an appropriate time to transplant white cabbage and Brussel sprouts sown end of March or early April, and sweet fennel sown in March-April / Keep planting lettuce and chard purchased in nursery pots, and leek bought in bunches / Transplant, if not done yet, young branch celery sprouts to a nursery, spaced every 2 inches in a grid pattern / Start harvesting rhubarb.

LANDSCAPING: Mow the lawn; compost lawn trimmings, mixing them together with straw, twigs and other nitrogen-poor plant material / Plant ornamental banana / Prune evergreen shrubs and boxwood (topiary, edges) and use the trimmings to prepare cuttings / Repot indoor leaf plants.

25 May
Leaf Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for settling herbs in the garden (in the vegetable patch, pair them with vegetables because they repel certain parasites) / Harvest horsetail and dry it in the shade / If you haven't had time to do so end of April, it's an appropriate time to transplant white cabbage and Brussel sprouts sown end of March or early April, and sweet fennel sown in March-April / Keep planting lettuce and chard purchased in nursery pots, and leek bought in bunches / Transplant, if not done yet, young branch celery sprouts to a nursery, spaced every 2 inches in a grid pattern / Start harvesting rhubarb.

LANDSCAPING: 2nd day to mow the lawn; compost lawn trimmings, mixing them together with straw, twigs and other nitrogen-poor plant material / Plant ornamental banana / Prune evergreen shrubs and boxwood (topiary, edges) and use the trimmings to prepare cuttings / Repot indoor leaf plants.

26 May
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

Don't garden before 6:40 AM – moon is at apogee at 1:38 AM

VEGETABLE PATCH: If not done yet, now is a new opportunity to transplant in rich compost-amended soil eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, all of which were sown in March or April, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels / Prune Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae plants that are already in the plot / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

27 May
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
First quarter
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day, if not done yet, for transplanting in rich compost-amended soil eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, all of which were sown in March or April, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels / Prune Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae plants that are already in the plot / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

28 May
Fruit Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day, if not done yet, for transplanting in rich compost-amended soil eggplant, chili, tomato, bell pepper, physalis, cucumber, pickle, squash, zucchini, pattypan squash, melon, all of which were sown in March or April, eventually protecting them with garden cloches or tunnels / Prune Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae plants that are already in the plot / Plant small berry shrub cuttings that you've prepared in fall or in January (red currant, raspberry...).

29 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: Plant Jerusalem artichoke in rich soil, not too moist, in full sun / Plant mashua: rows spaced 2½ feet (80 cm) apart, 2 inches (5cm) deep, with a planting distance of 14 inches (35 cm); ridge soil up around stems when they're 6 inches tall (15 cm) / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past); ridge potatoes planted earlier if they're tall enough; you can start harvesting early potato from the earlier varieties as needs arise / Plant spring garlic / Transplant once again your celeriac sown at the beginning of spring, and thin your other root crop vegetables / Transplant leek sown at the end of winter (pull them out, let them cure for 2 days in the sun, then dress leaves and roots and plant) / Plant crosnes in light soil (4 inches or 10 cm deep, in groups of 3, spaced 18 inches or 40 cm apart to all sides).

30 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 2nd day for planting Jerusalem artichoke in rich soil, not too moist, in full sun / Plant mashua: rows spaced 2½ feet (80 cm) apart, 2 inches (5cm) deep, with a planting distance of 14 inches (35 cm); ridge soil up around stems when they're 6 inches tall (15 cm) / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past); ridge potatoes planted earlier if they're tall enough; you can start harvesting early potato from the earlier varieties as needs arise / Plant spring garlic / Transplant once again your celeriac sown at the beginning of spring, and thin your other root crop vegetables / Transplant leek sown at the end of winter (pull them out, let them cure for 2 days in the sun, then dress leaves and roots and plant) / Plant crosnes in light soil (4 inches or 10 cm deep, in groups of 3, spaced 18 inches or 40 cm apart to all sides).

31 May
Roots Day
Descending Moon
Ephemeris:

VEGETABLE PATCH: 3rd day for planting Jerusalem artichoke in rich soil, not too moist, in full sun / Plant mashua: rows spaced 2½ feet (80 cm) apart, 2 inches (5cm) deep, with a planting distance of 14 inches (35 cm); ridge soil up around stems when they're 6 inches tall (15 cm) / Plant storage potato, to ridge when plants reach 8 inches (20 cm) tall (in cold climates, you can wait until all risks of freezing are past); ridge potatoes planted earlier if they're tall enough; you can start harvesting early potato from the earlier varieties as needs arise / Plant spring garlic / Transplant once again your celeriac sown at the beginning of spring, and thin your other root crop vegetables / Transplant leek sown at the end of winter (pull them out, let them cure for 2 days in the sun, then dress leaves and roots and plant) / Plant crosnes in light soil (4 inches or 10 cm deep, in groups of 3, spaced 18 inches or 40 cm apart to all sides).

Legend
Day Moon Moon disc

* Times on this calendar are for the North Hemisphere. They're given in Universal Time (GMT), meaning they're computed based on the Greenwich meridian.

Depending on where you live, you can adjust the time down to the exact minute to have your true "local moon planting time". If you're East of the Greenwich meridian, you must add minutes; if West, subtract them. A good rule of thumb is to consider your time zone: if your local time is GMT+1, as in Paris, then you must add an hour; if it's GMT-5, as in New York, you must subtract 5 hours. A node at 3PM GMT in London will take place at 4PM (16:00) in Paris and 10AM in New York. You can even adjust for minutes in the same manner, if you're far east or west within your time zone.

In addition, in some parts of the world, you might have to adjust these times because of "Daylight Saving Time". In this case, you should adjust by an hour compared to Standard Time, in addition to the modification resulting from your timezone.

** Gardening isn't recommended 5-6 hours before and after a lunar node, apogee or perigee.

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Your reactions
  • cate maccoll wrote on 19 June 2024 at 22 h 38 min
    im super confused, this calender says the full moon was on the 4th and the new moon is on the 18th, but thats not correct. this can’t be the calender for 2024, it does say it is though. help anyone?

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

  • Lu Narine wrote on 27 May 2024 at 21 h 01 min

    I’m mystified why 5 days of the end of May are missing from the website.ie May 27-31.
    Hard to know what tasks are best done during this period. Do you have the data to email me?

    Was this an oversight or intentional? I find your site is SUCH an asset to my gardening and I appreciate it!!!!!

  • Susan Vaughn wrote on 22 May 2024 at 4 h 19 min

    Can I transplant a “Japanese Maple” after May 21-May 31st. 2024? The plant is 2′ high

  • Kay Dunbar wrote on 8 April 2024 at 5 h 31 min

    I love the calendars that my pharmacy puts out every year which show the best sign of the moon when to plant flowers and garden with seeds or plants and has a sheet at back or calendar with information. It has all the information about that you need for flowers and garden but I never got one this year . He was out when I went so I got on the computer to see what I could find. I just came upon this but haven’t got to read all of it but what I have seen, looks like you have covered everything for flowers and garden.

  • Barb wrote on 6 January 2024 at 17 h 32 min

    On the Planting by the Moon calendar for Jan 6 2024 there is a statement which indicates it is time to “set up rose hips” for grafting. How exactly do you set up rose hips?