Fall garden checklist

Days grow shorter and frost spells are just around the corner… Here’s a checklist of what needs to be accomplished in fall before it starts getting cold.

In more detail

In an ornamental garden

“On Saint Michael’s feast, warmth rises to the heavens”. What does this saying tell us? From end of September onwards, you can start bringing your geraniums indoors and protect frost-vulnerable flowers. Use mulch or plastic films for this, depending on how you strike the balance between being environmentally friendly and practical. Pick the last flowers to prepare ornamental dried flower bouquets. Hydrangea flowers, for instance: after picking them, douse them with hair spray and they will keep for much longer.

If you must move those rose trees that have taken up too much space, now is the time. Prepare the ground well because their roots need loose, rich soil to spread fast. Place them in a sunny spot that isn’t scoured by drafty wind.

You can also plant spring-blooming bulbs (tulips, crocus, hyacinths, narcissus, etc.). Don’t bury them any deeper than twice their height. Try to find a planter that is specifically designed for planting bulbs, since the usual pointed vegetable planter tends to leave an air pocket beneath the bulb. Pull summer-blooming bulbs out and store them in a metal box after having dried them and sprinkled them with sulfur.

If you’ve got any time left, mow the lawn one last time and rake dead leaves away. Spread compost atop future flower beds. Trim and prune conifer hedges for the last time of the season, or replace them with mixed hedges that offer more variety and look surprisingly different as seasons roll on.

If you’ve set a water basin up, pull out the remaining dead leaves from the bottom and cover it with a net. To provide fish with oxygen if ever the basin freezes over, keep an old playball or a faggot (the bundle of twigs, mind you) upright to break the surface and keep it from hardening entirely. When the cold winter will have settled in, think to feed the birds with fat and oil-rich seeds: rape, sunflower, millet, etc.

In the food garden

Basket of applesStart picking autumn fruits (pears, apples
) on sunny days. Store them in a dark and well-ventilated room. After the harvest, rake fallen leaves and mummified or rotten fruits to burn them. Don’t throw diseased plant parts in the compost. Go ahead and plant new fruit trees, preferably varieties that resist diseases.

In the vegetable patch, harvest whatever is left and freeze everything you can’t eat or preserve immediately. Fertilize the soil for the following season or add green manure.

Pierrick Le Jardinier

Fall garden tasks on social media

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Picture related to the article overlaid with the Facebook logo.

Credits for images shared to Nature & Garden (all edits by Gaspard Lorthiois):
Pots on fence by cortez13 under Pixabay license
Red apple harvest by Matthias Böckel under Pixabay license
On social media – wonderful autumn apple by Julita under Pixabay license