Bunching onion (or Welsh onion), a delicious herb

Bunch of bunching onion

Bunching onion, also called Welsh onion, Spring onion or even sometimes long green onion, is a delicious vegetable but also an herb that has a distinctive taste.

A bunch of Bunching onion facts

NameAllium fistulosum
Family – Alliaceae
Type – Herbs and spices, perennial

Height – 8 to 20 inches (20 to 50 cm)
Exposure – full sun
Soil – rich enough

Harvest – May to October

Easy to grow, it is part of the same family as garlic, onion or shallot.

Sowing and planting of bunching onion

Prepare for sowing directly in the plot starting from the month of March, when the worst of the winter colds are over, or wait for the end of April or even May.

  • You can even sow until July to stage the harvest and savor it until October.

Upon sowing, it is beneficial to amend your soil with compost or soil mix in order to spur the plant’s growth.

An excellent advantage of spring onion is that the root system is very shallow. Any container, even an old, leaking bird bath, will hold enough soil for it to thrive!

Young spring onions coming up

All there is to know about bunching onion

Harvesting welsh onionVery closely related to common onion, both through its appearance and through its delicate and fine taste, bunching onion is a fabulous herb that is easy to grow.

It is called Welsh onion in some regions, but various species exist that are either “white” or “common red”.

  • Use the latter for part sun exposure, since it can cope with the shade and still has the same taste.
  • These enter into most summer dishes as delicious extras, can be eaten raw in mixed salads or cooked to spice and flavor sauces and omelets.

It’s a very healthy spice to add to your menu. For instance, this allium even bolsters chances of resisting cancer.

Smart tip about bunching onion

Harvest the leaves throughout the entire growing phase of the plant (as early as 3 months after sowing).

To harvest white bunching onion as long as possible, stage the sowing in time, from April to July.


Credits for images shared to Nature & Garden (all edits by Gaspard Lorthiois):
Bunch of bunchings by Dom Carver under Pixabay license
Flailing bunching onions by J Garget under Pixabay license
Ripe harvest by Squirrel_photos under Pixabay license