A green balcony, even in winter

Don’t leave your garden boxes and pots empty during the cold season: many plants will let you landscape your balcony with plants in winter.

Green is go in winter

Camellia, winter jasmine, hellebore, cyclamen
 Certain flowers are able to brave the frost to put on a show with winter flowers. If you’ve got a green thumb, it would be a shame to waste it over the winter. Add those plants to pot arrangements with a few evergreen plants that share the same needs (type of soil, minimum temperature…).

If you would rather have plants that are really easy to grow, forget the flowers altogether. They tend to still be quite vulnerable to the cold and to winter drafts. Best play around with shades of green, sizes and shapes with evergreens such as ivy, bamboo, boxwood, pieris
 and remember to check all the small conifers.

Spots of color on the balcony in winter

To add spots of color, try planting winter heather, the most hardy of all flower plants, and also berry shrubs such as American wintergreen, skimmia or holly. Take note that skimmia must be brought indoors if temperatures drop below 40°F (5°C).

Either purchase your holly with berries (female specimen) or buy a self-pollinating one like ‘JC van Tol’ or ‘Alaska’ to ensure you’ll have fruits.

Grasses (fescue, carex) will give volume to the arrangement, and ornamental cabbage will draw eyes for uniqueness.

Proper growing conditions

Great plants for a winter balcony are wintergreen, skimmia and heather, all shown.Select plastic for your pots and garden boxes, it has the advantage of not deteriorating when it freezes. You can hide the plastic with wooden boxes. Provide for a depth of at least 16 inches (40 cm) for small shrubs.

Plant very densely (the plants aren’t in their vegetation phase), in special balcony plant soil mix. Remember to layer along the bottom of the pot something for drainage (clay pebbles and garden textiles) because stagnant water and cold is not a good pair. Similarly, slide a separator between your pot arrangements and the floor, to isolate them from the cold and avoid having them wallow in puddles in case of rain.

Check that the garden boxes aren’t on the path of drafts, behind wind-breakers. Also, have a few pieces of winterizing fleece at hand, like bubble wrap or Styrofoam that will be useful in case of deep cold.

Laure Hamann


Credits for images shared to Nature & Garden (all edits by Gaspard Lorthiois):
Lush winter balcony by Gabor Jeszenszky under Pixabay license
Wintergreen & heather by Ute KĂŒhne under Pixabay license