Nasturtium vs. Aphids

Whether in the vegetable patch, around fruit trees or near rose trees, Nasturtium plant can be propagated without restrictions.

It is a twining vine that starts spreading when the weather warms up in spring.

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Nasturtiums and aphids, a trick decoy plant

If you have heard that these beautiful cute little nasturtiums flowers will help you deal with aphids, that hearsay was correct!

Aphid colony infesting a nasturtium plant destroying the flowerActually, nasturtiums exert a powerful attraction on aphids. Don’t be surprised to see nasturtiums covered in aphids: that means all the aphids are brought in the same place.

Your rose trees, vegetables and other plants are spared from the aphid onslaught!

Soft green underside of a nasturtium leaf with a new colony of aphids growing along the veinsIn other words, if aphids are hogging the nasturtiums, they aren’t on any other plants!

You’ll find the aphids on the stems of flowers or on the undersides of nasturtium leaves.

Another flower also attracts aphids in a similar manner: cosmos.

Other plants have an opposite effect on aphids and repel them: this is the case for marigolds and lavender.

Disposing of aphid colonies on nasturtiums

Once your decoy is in place, visit the growing bed every two or three days. You can spot new aphid colonies on your nasturtiums easily. Carefully pick or cut the colonies into a small pail. Do this delicately so aphids don’t fall off and get away.

Your best solution then is to feed them to your chickens, but it’s also good to simply bury them deep under the compost pile or burn them.

Read also on aphids


Credits for images shared to Nature & Garden (all edits by Gaspard Lorthiois):
Nasturtium before aphid attack by Marion Kelzenberg ★ under Pixabay license
Aphids devouring nasturtium by Linda Severson ★ under © CC BY-NC 2.0
Nasturtium leaf luring aphids by Hans Braxmeier under Pixabay license